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Tuesday, July 31, 2012

To Be A Dog


To be a dog, I think, would be such fun
You could lie all day and bask in the sun
No cares or worries, no deadlines to meet
You’re only care would be what to eat
People who care for your every command
You’d feel like you’re the king of the land
No homework or business presentations to give
That would truly be a great way to live
Dogs are always loved by one and all
From the young to the old, from short to tall
To be a dog, I wish it could come true
But being human can be fun too!

Monday, July 23, 2012

Savior Dog


Evie sat on the front porch of her Denver home, playing with her new puppy, Sparky. She rubbed him on the belly as he thumped his tail. Evie really loved her new puppy, even though she had only known him for a day. Her father had brought the puppy as a surprise gift when he came back from a business trip. He told Evie that it would keep her company, since both her parents worked for most of the day and she was an only child. Evie was delighted to have a new companion to spend the days with.

Three years later, Evie was fifteen and Sparky had not grown very much; he was still really small and energetic. One early November evening, Evie was cuddling with Sparky in front of the television. It was raining outside and it was very cold, so they were covered in blankets. Just then a news report came on, telling about an escaped murderer who had broken out of the county jail the day before.

“He is still on the loose. If you see him, do not approach him! He is very dangerous and police believe that he may be armed,” the reporter was saying, “If you do catch sight of him, call the police right away and stay away.”

“Well Sparky, if he comes by here, you’ll protect me won’t you?” Evie joked. Sparky barked and licked her face.

Just then there was a knock on the door. Evie peeled away all the blankets, muted the TV, and made her way to the door. She looked through the peephole. She could hear Sparky behind her, growling at the door. There was a man she didn’t recognize standing on her front porch. Suddenly she felt wary, thinking of the news report. She left the safety chain on and pulled the door open an inch.

“Who is it?” She asked.

“I was driving home when my car broke down,” the man gestured to a car down the street, “I was wondering if I could use your telephone.”

“I’m sorry, but I can’t let you in.” Evie told him, trying to shut the door, but he put his foot in the gap.

“Please, my wife is in the car and so is my three month old son. I need to use the phone,” the stranger said, putting his hand in the gap too, holding the door open.

“No, I can’t.” Evie pleaded, hanging on to the door.

The man suddenly got angry and shoved the door open as far as he could with the chain on. Evie gasped and started backing away. Suddenly the man pulled out a knife and sliced the chain. Evie screamed and ran away, scooping up Sparky as she went. The man followed on her heels. She realized that this was the murderer! She made it to the living room and grabbed her cell phone before the man stumbled through the doorway. Sparky leaped out of her arms.

“No Sparky!” she shrieked.

Sparky ran to the stranger and ran around his ankles. He gave the dog a kick and Sparky went flying. Evie screamed again and tried to run to Sparky. But before she could reach him, the stranger came towards her, so she turned and ran up the stairs. She could hear him thundering behind her. She made it to the top and ran to hide. She went into her room, locked the door and into her closet. She pulled out her cell phone.

“Hello, 911? I need help. The escaped murderer is in my house and is trying to kill me! I’m all alone and don’t know what to do!” Evie frantically whispered. “I live at 3425 Woodwind Lane. Please help me!”

Just then the murderer broke down Evie’s door. She stifled a gasp and tried to shrink into the shadows, her heart beating fast. She could hear him stumbling around her room, looking for her. Then, he tore open the door to her closet and looked down at her. He leered at her and gave a maniacal laugh. Evie felt for sure that she was going to die. But just as the murderer raised his knife, she heard a bark. The murderer turned, just as Sparky leaped onto his back. Sparky dug his claws into the man’s back and started scratching. The man screamed in agony and doubled over, so Evie was able to get up and give him a good kick.

She scooped up Sparky again and ran back downstairs, away from the murderer. As she reached the living room again, she heard sirens outside her house and police shouting. Within seconds, the cops swarmed into her home. She told them that the murderer was upstairs. They ran up and the man was once again under control.

“You did a good job of calling us,” the police chief told her after the murderer was shackled and put away in a police car, “But how did you get away from him?”

“I would never have survived if I didn’t have my Sparky.” Evie said, gazing at Sparky, who was being petted by the other cops, “He is my savior dog!”

Monday, July 16, 2012

Think Before You Speak


Did you ever get the feeling that you couldn’t hold something in and had to tell someone? Do you ever need to say something even though you shouldn’t? Can you never keep a secret? Well then, you might understand me. I am a blabber-mouth. I can’t keep what’s on my mind from slipping out of my big mouth. I have lost friends because of this, but they always came back. It never really affected me. At least, never before. Then it cost me the life of one of my greatest friends.

            It was the beginning of my 9th grade year. She was always an odd person, not the sharpest knife in the drawer, but really sweet. I never expected that she would do what she did.  I had always wondered what was wrong with her. Anyone could see that she wasn’t normal, but I always just assumed she was shy. She would never read aloud in class or answer any questions out loud. She always seemed to do everything backwards.

            I decided to become her friend, and find out what was her problem. Over the next month, I tried to gain her trust, and I guess I succeeded, because one day she confided in me her secret. She had dyslexia.

            I know I probably should have tried harder to keep her secret, but it didn’t seem like that big of a deal. A lot of people have dyslexia. But, she was more sensitive than I realized. For a while, I really did try to keep the secret, but I guess I just got careless. Why else would I mention it to the school’s biggest gossip, Brittney? She ran the gossip column in the newspaper, so within a week, everyone in the school knew about her secret. Suddenly, she stopped coming to school. No one knew where she was, not even her parents! A month passed and still she hadn’t shown up. Her parents had called the police, and one night, I got a call from them. The good news was that they had found my friend. The bad news? She was at the bottom of a lake.

            I immediately rushed over there, even though it was nearly midnight. I wasn’t able to see my friend, but I’m not sure I would have wanted to. The police told me that there was a box in her pocket, and handed it to me. There was a note inside, protected from decay by the box. She had written that she had done this because she couldn’t bear the thought of anyone knowing about her secret. She chose to end her life rather than have people treat her like she was below them, because of her problem.

            Even to this day, many years later, I carry the guilt of being the one who had caused her to do such a thing. And I hope my story has taught you a lesson. Be careful about what you say or tell people, because you have no idea of how it can affect others.

Monday, July 9, 2012

King of the Sea


In my head I imagine, a majestic sight
A creature that makes fish tremble with fright
The king of the sea, a leader of oceans
Who moves and hunts in graceful motions
He is swift and cunning, not one to be fooled
Always the ruler, never the ruled
If he scopes you out, you better beware
Soon you will be found no where
He is the king, there is no debate
If you cross him, you must meet your fate